November/December 2011 Message

By Jerry Medowar

"THE THREE R’S"

Of the three R’s, Reading…Writing…Arithmetic, the most important “R” is Reading. Once you are skilled in
reading, you can learn anything including writing and arithmetic. As your librarian I find that the children
who attend our temple school are avid readers. A short time ago I assembled about 25 children’s books on
different levels, put them in a shopping cart and had planned to visit all the classroom and try to interest the
youngsters in these books and my hope was that they would borrow one of them. To my surprise after visiting
only two classrooms, all my books were taken. 

Unfortunately there are lots of youngsters who do not enjoy reading. Maybe they need glasses…you should
check! But there are those with no eyesight problem who do not like to read. This dislike will set them back
in school throughout their education. 

I recently read an article in “Newsday” by Jennifer Berger that I thought was extremely valuable. She
called her article “Hooked on Books”. I am going to excerpt bits of this wonderful article:

SHARE YOUR FAVORITE BOOK.
“Let your kids know that the book is one you remember fondly from childhood.”

BE SILLY.
“Read books to your kids that will make them laugh.”

MAKE A GAME OF IT.
Marie Drucker of the Malverne library makes the following suggestion: “Schools are following the
D.E.A.R. program ‘Drop Everything and Read’ Try this at home once a week—say Sunday
evening: Everyone stops what they’re are doing and reads a book, even if you are in the middle of making
dinner or your child is playing a video game!”

PARTICIPATE IN STORY TIME.
“Take your children to free story times at your local library.”

SET A GOOD EXAMPLE.
“We all know that children learn by watching what we do. Try spending some time each day reading something
you enjoy while your children are around, and share with them what you like about the book.”

STORE BOOKS WHERE YOU STORE TOYS.

TAKE TURNS READING.

FIND TOPICS YOUR KIDS LOVE.

LET YOUR CHILD BE THE AUTHOR.
Debbie Bush of the Comsewogue library suggests: “Ask your child to come up with a story and tell it to you.
Write it down on different pages and ask him to illustrate each page of the story. That night read it to
him—He’ll get a kick out of it.”

AND JERRY YOUR LIBRARIAN SAYS: 
Bring him or her to our library. The door to the library is open whenever the Temple is open. Just put your
name and phone number on the card in back of the book and leave it in the box on the librarian’s desk.